Programme

Speakers will provide a variety of perspectives from different academic and professional backgrounds. This page provides details of featured presentations, the conference schedule and other programming. For more information about presenters, please visit the Speakers page.


Conference Outline*

Friday, November 08, 2019Saturday, November 09, 2019Sunday, November 10, 2019

09:00-9:30 Conference Registration & Coffee & Networking Session | Main Hall (2F)

09:30-09:40 Announcements & Welcome Address | Main Hall (2F)
Recognition of IAFOR Scholarship Winners
Brian Aycock, IAFOR, Japan

09:40-09:55 Welcome Remarks from the Officiating Guest | Main Hall (2F)
Bernard Charnwut Chan, Executive Council of the Government of the Hong Kong SAR, Hong Kong

09:55-10:05 Video Show: Lingnan University | Main Hall (2F)

10:10-10:30 Launch Ceremony of Asia Pacific Higher Education Research Partnership @ Lingnan University

10:30-10:40 Welcome Address | Main Hall (2F)
Joshua Mok Ka-Ho, Lingnan University, Hong Kong

10:40-11:25 Keynote Presentation | Main Hall (2F)
Boya Education in China: Lessons from Liberal Arts Education in the U.S. and Hong Kong
Leonard K. Cheng, Lingnan University, Hong Kong

11:25-12:10 Featured Presentation | Main Hall (2F)
Questing for Sustainable Development in Higher Education: The Role of Liberal Arts Education
Joshua Mok Ka-ho, Lingnan University, Hong Kong

12:10-12:20 Conference Photograph | Main Hall (2F)

12:20-13:30 Lunch Break | Main Hall (2F)

13:30-14:15 Keynote Presentation | Main Hall (2F)
Graduate Employment and Under-employment
Francis Green, University College London, Institute of Education, UK

14:15-15:00 Keynote Presentation | Main Hall (2F)
Engaging the Forces Propelling the Repurposing of Higher Education
Deane Neubauer, East-West Center, USA

15:00-15:30 Coffee Break & Networking Session | Main Hall (2F)

15:30-16:00 Keynote Presentation | Main Hall (2F)
Uncertain Futures of the Past: ‘Repurposing’ American Higher Education, 1945-1965
Adam R. Nelson, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA

16:00-16:30 Keynote Presentation | Main Hall (2F)
Equal but Different: Global and Regional Implications of the Rise of China in Universities and Science
Simon Marginson, University of Oxford, UK

16:30-17:30 Conference Poster Session | Main Hall (2F)

17:30-18:30 Conference Welcome Reception & Musical Performance by Lingnan Artists | Main Hall (2F)

09:00-10:40 Parallel Session I
09:00-11:00: Asia Pacific Higher Education Research Partnership Symposium

10:40-11:00 Coffee Break

11:00-12:15 Parallel Session II
11:00-12:15 Asia Pacific Higher Education Research Partnership Symposium

12:15-13:30 Lunch Break

13:30-14:45 Parallel Session III
13:30-14:45 Asia Pacific Higher Education Research Partnership Symposium

14:45-15:00 Coffee Break

15:00-16:40 Parallel Session IV
15:00-16:40 Asia Pacific Higher Education Research Partnership Symposium

18:00-20:00: Conference Dinner (Optional Extra)

09:00-10:40 Parallel Session I

10:40-11:00 Coffee Break & Networking Session

11:00-12:40 Parallel Session II

12:40-13:00 Closing Session


The draft version of the Conference Programme will be available online on October 07, 2019. All registered delegates will be notified of this publication by email.

*Please be aware that the above schedule may be subject to change.


Featured Programming

  • Equal but Different: Global and Regional Implications of the Rise of China in Universities and Science
    Equal but Different: Global and Regional Implications of the Rise of China in Universities and Science
    Keynote Presentation: Simon Marginson
  • Engaging the Forces Propelling the Repurposing of Higher Education
    Engaging the Forces Propelling the Repurposing of Higher Education
    Keynote Presentation: Deane Neubauer
  • Boya Education in China: Lessons from Liberal Arts Education in the U.S. and Hong Kong
    Boya Education in China: Lessons from Liberal Arts Education in the U.S. and Hong Kong
    Keynote Presentation: Leonard K. Cheng
  • Uncertain Futures of the Past: “Repurposing” American Higher Education, 1945–1965
    Uncertain Futures of the Past: “Repurposing” American Higher Education, 1945–1965
    Keynote Presentation: Adam Nelson
  • Graduate Employment and Under-Employment
    Graduate Employment and Under-Employment
    Keynote Presentation: Francis Green

Draft Programme

The Conference Programme contains access information, session information and a detailed day-to-day presentation schedule. All registered delegates who attend The IAFOR Conference for Higher Education Research – Hong Kong receive a printed copy of the Conference Programme at the Registration Desk on arrival. Only one copy of the Conference Programme is available per delegate, so please take good care of your copy.

The final draft of the conference presentation schedule is now available. Please check that all information pertaining to you is correct and notify us at cher-hongkong@iafor.org if there is any error. Please notify us of any corrections by Sunday, October 13.

After minor changes have been made to the schedule we will send you a link to the final schedule.
The final schedule will contain session information and a detailed day-to-day presentation schedule (including room allocations and session chairs).

This will be available on Monday, October 28.

Accepted abstracts of confirmed presenters are available here.


Previous Programming

View details of programming for past CHER conferences via the links below.

Equal but Different: Global and Regional Implications of the Rise of China in Universities and Science
Keynote Presentation: Simon Marginson

The rapid development of higher education and the associated research in China is now well documented. The gross enrolment ratio, the proportion of school leavers entering tertiary education, rose from 5 per cent in 1996 to 51 per cent in 2017. The number of Chinese mainland universities in the Shanghai ARWU top 500 grew from eight universities in 2005 to 58 in 2018. In physical sciences STEM research, the leading Chinese universities now produce as many high citation research papers, in English, as the leading universities from the United States. The growth of science in China has coincided with the emergence of the global system of science publishing which has now achieved a dominant role in research, and has been built on a high level of internationalisation, including US-China collaboration. In the next period, the processes of rapid growth and improvement in China may become impeded by geo-political conflict, including restrictions on people mobility and exchange of technology, but one suspects that China’s higher education and science systems are now sufficiently developed and self-sufficient to sustain a strong regional and global role under such conditions. The paper will reflect on the similarities and differences between universities in China and Euro-America and the implications of the emerging bipolar world for the evolution of both global higher education and China.

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Engaging the Forces Propelling the Repurposing of Higher Education
Keynote Presentation: Deane Neubauer

This paper explores the nature and some of the probable effects on higher education (HE) of four major emergent global dynamics: the emergence of the Work 4.0 culture, climate change, the continuing pattern of national and international realignments, and transforming population dynamics--in particular, the aging of global populations. All four of these macro social changes will impact HE in a variety of ways. This paper focuses on suggesting ways in which HE as a social value and set of practices may respond to these macro changes. In specific I inquire into the varied elements of Work 4.0 and seek to link them to the repurposing of HE. I also ask how an impending global climate change emergency will impact higher education with particular emphasis on the likely responses of both national governments and international organizations. This focus dovetails in some national settings (most specifically the USA) with the rise of nationalism and a policy predilection for national versus international solutions to various issues. And finally, the paper raises the question of how changing population dynamics are affecting HE, in specific, the kinds of novel subject matter, research and delivery systems that will likely emerge with a globally aging population?

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Boya Education in China: Lessons from Liberal Arts Education in the U.S. and Hong Kong
Keynote Presentation: Leonard K. Cheng

In this paper I shall discuss the importance of China’s "boya" education (BYE), which has a tradition similar to that of the West’s liberal arts education (LAE), in the era of computer-based automation and Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies. Drawing on the experience of BYE in Mainland China and LAE in the United States and Hong Kong, I argue that (a) for BYE to achieve its goals in China it should occupy a central rather than tangential role in the undergraduate curriculum, (b) professional or technical training is not only compatible with the fundamental values of boya or liberal arts but also is helpful in showcasing the touted strengths of BYE and LAE, and (c) the combined benefits of BYE or LAE on the one hand and professional or technical training on the other may be achieved by pursuing both undergraduate and postgraduate studies.

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Uncertain Futures of the Past: “Repurposing” American Higher Education, 1945–1965
Keynote Presentation: Adam Nelson

On the one hand, the United States after World War II built a higher-education system that became the envy of the world. On the other hand, the construction of that system provoked such intense student backlash that it nearly fell apart. While the story of global student protest during the late 1960s is well known, this lecture considers the causes and consequences of student alienation during the early 1960s, when many students became increasingly critical of the mass institutions – including the “multi-versities”– they inhabited. As they expressed their fears of an “uncertain future” marked by seemingly inexorable technological change (from industrial automation to nuclear proliferation to environmental degradation), they saw the university as both “the problem” and “the solution”. This story may hold lessons for global university leaders today.

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Graduate Employment and Under-Employment
Keynote Presentation: Francis Green

For those investing their time and money in university study, the uncertain prospects of finding a “graduate job” after achieving their qualification has been casting a gloom over higher education in many countries. Pessimists argue that the number of graduate jobs are not expanding fast enough to absorb the increasing number of graduates, and fear that the widespread introduction of robotic production will exacerbate this trend; while optimists emphasise the continuing average “returns” to higher education in the labour market, and expect that new jobs will emerge to replace those that disappear with new technologies. At the root of the issue is the fact that the graduate labour market is not a typical short-term micro-market, with an equilibrating price-mechanism ensuring that the supply of and demand for graduate skills remain closely aligned. With institutional and macroeconomic differences across nations, the risk for graduates of not finding employment in graduate jobs is expected to vary. In this talk I will report on a project that has been building a comparable picture of recent graduate labour markets in countries with high participation systems of higher education, especially drawing on evidence from Europe. I will analyse the supplies of graduates, the numbers of graduate jobs and the disequilibrium trends over a decade, alongside evidence of the changing dispersion of graduates’ wages.

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